Meet our new members

Oslo Cancer Cluster proudly presents the new members that have joined our organisation during the second quarter of 2019.

The new members represent a valuable addition to our non-profit member organisation, which encompasses the whole oncology value chain. By being a part of Oslo Cancer Cluster, our members are connected to a global network with many relevant key players in the cancer research field. Our members contribute to this unique ecosystem and ensure the development of innovative cancer treatments to improve patients’ lives.

 

 

Theradex Oncology

Theradex Oncology provides global clinical development services exclusively to companies developing new cancer treatments. The company has a strong emphasis on early drug development. It provides regulatory and medical support for companies taking cancer treatments into clinical development in the US and Europe.

Theradex Oncology staff has participated in educational events at Oslo Cancer Cluster for a number of years. This is how they became familiar with the cluster.

“Oslo Cancer Cluster provides a unique opportunity to share knowledge with other professionals dedicated to developing new cancer treatments.” Meg Valnoski, President Theradex Oncology

Meg Valnoski explains how the company has been supporting the development of cancer treatments for over 30 years and experienced the advancements in cancer treatments over that time.

 “We are always working to expand our knowledge and experience in cancer drug development to support our partnerships with companies developing new therapies for cancer treatment.”

Catapult Life Science

Catapult Life Science is a centre established to bridge the gap between the lab and the industry, providing infrastructure, equipment and expertise for product development and industrialisation in Norway. It has been formed as a result of joint efforts from a range of different players with a common goal of enabling more industrialisation of life science research in Norway, truly what the Norwegians call a dugnad.

“We see Oslo Cancer Cluster as a key partner for realising our purpose, which is to create new opportunities for product development and industrialisation in Norway.” Astrid Hilde Myrset, CEO Catapult Life Science

Myrset adds:

“Our vision is ‘Bringing science to life’, which implies enabling new ideas to a be developed in Norway for new employment in the pharma industry, new growth in the Norwegian economy, and last but not least, new products to the market, enabling a longer and healthier life for patients.”

 

This post is part of a series of articles, which will introduce the new members of our organisation every three months.

  • To find out who else is involved in Oslo Cancer Cluster, view the full list of members
  • Follow us on Facebook or subscribe to our newsletter to always stay up to date!

 

Gunhild M. Mælandsmo, Per Morten Sandset and Cathrine M. Lofthus have joined our board.

New board members

We are happy to welcome three new members to the board of Oslo Cancer Cluster. Find out what they had to say about entering their new positions.

Per Morten Sandset

Per Morten Sandset is a Senior Consultant in hematology at the Oslo University Hospital and a professor in thrombosis research at the University of Oslo. He has previously been head of the Department of Hematology and Deputy Director of the Medical Division at Ullevål University Hospital and Director of Research, Innovation and Education of the southeastern Norway Health Region. He is currently Vice-Rector at the University of Oslo with responsibilities for research and innovation including the life sciences activities of the university. Sandset has published more than 315 original publications and supervised 30 PhD students.

Why did you join the board of Oslo Cancer Cluster?

“There are currently strong political expectations that the many scientific achievements in the life sciences can be utilized, commercialized and eventually form the basis for new industry.”

“Oslo Cancer Cluster has matured to become a major player of the research  and innovation ecosystem within the life science area in Oslo and also on a national level. This is why being on the board is so interesting and important.”

What do you hope to achieve in your new role?

“As a OCC board member, I want to strengthen and develop the collaboration across the sectors, i.e., between the hospitals and the university – and between academia and industry. On a larger scale, it is about establishing a regional ecosystem that take achievements of the basic sciences into the development of enterprises. Oslo Cancer Cluster should maintain its role as the major player in the cancer area.”

Gunhild M. Mælandsmo

Gunhild Mari Mælandsmo

Gunhild M. Mælandsmo is the head of Department of Tumor Biology, Institute for Cancer Research, Oslo University Hospital where she also is heading the “Metastasis Biology and Experimental Therapeutics” research group. She is a Professor at Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø.

Why did you join the board of Oslo Cancer Cluster?

“I think the concept of Oslo Cancer Cluster is very interesting, fostering a close collaboration between academia, health care providers and the health industry. 

“Focusing on translational research for many years, I think I can contribute in the board with valuable experience in several parts of the value chain; from basic science, from translational aspects and from my close collaboration with clinical partners as well as administrative experience.”

What do you hope to achieve in your new role?

“I hope I can contribute with valuable knowledge – both from cancer research and from my administrative experience from Oslo University Hospital. I also hope to see more products from small Norwegian companies reaching clinical testing and expanding the biotech industry. Finally, I hope to see the Norwegian health care system more active in providing precision cancer medicine (and to utilise the advantages we have when it comes to registries etc).”

Cathrine M. Lofthus

Cathrine M. Lofthus is the CEO at the Norwegian South East Regional Health Authority (Helse Sør-Øst RHF). She has previously held several leading positions at Aker University Hospital and at Oslo University Hospital. Lofthus is a qualified doctor from the University of Oslo, where she also completed a PhD in endocrinology. She also holds qualifications in economy, administration and leadership, and has experience from the health sector as a clinician, researcher and leader. Lofthus also holds directorships in Norsk helsenett and KLP, in addition to being a member of the board of National e-Health.

 

We also wish to extend a special thank you to our previous board members:

  • Kirsten Haugland, Head of the Research and Prevention Department at the Norwegian Cancer Society.
  • Inger Sandlie, professor at the Department of Biosciences, University of Oslo and research group leader at the Department of Immunology, Oslo University Hospital.
  • Øyvind Bruland, professor of clinical oncology at the University of Oslo and consultant oncologist at The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital.
Tor Haugen attended a work placement at Thermo Fisher Scientific, arranged by Oslo Cancer Cluster and Ullern Upper Secondary School, where he tried DNA profiling. Photo: Elisabeth Kirkeng Andersen

DNA profiling on the syllabus

Tor takes a mouthswab before in order to profile his DNA.

Students learned about a Norwegian invention behind CAR T-cell therapy and DNA profiling on their latest work placement.

This article is also available in Norwegian here.

Thermo Fisher Scientific is a global company that develops the Norwegian technology, which is based on “Ugelstad-kulene” (The Ugelstad Beads). In June 2019, Einar, Tor, Olav and Philip from Ullern Upper Secondary School completed a work placement with Thermo Fisher Scientific in Oslo. They used the beads to profile their own DNA and learned how the beads can be used to find murderers, diagnose heart attacks and save children from cancer.

“What do you plan to study when you finish upper secondary school?” Marie asks.

“The natural sciences,” Einar and Tor replies.

“The natural sciences at NTNU,” Olav says.

“First, the natural sciences and then, join the Air Force,” Philip answers.

Marie Bosnes is supervising the students who are attending the work placement and has worked more than 24 years in the Norwegian section of Thermo Fisher Scientific. She conducts research and development in the former monastery located on Montebello, next to Oslo Cancer Cluster Innovation Park and Ullern Upper Secondary School.

Today, Marie and several of her co-workers have taken time out of their busy schedules to tutor the four students from Ullern: Einar Johannes Rye, Tor Haugen, Olav Bekken and Philip Horn Børge-Ask. The students have nearly finished their second year and have so far focused their studies on mathematics, physics, chemistry and biology. But next year, they will also study programming, instead of biology.

“It is a good mix of subjects, especially programming is useful to learn. You should consider studying bioinformatics, because, in the future, it will be a very desirable qualification,” Marie says.

Marie has studied biology and her co-workers call her Reodor Felgen (a character from a famous Norwegian children’s comic book), since she loves to constantly explore research on new topics.

Treating cancer

An ullern student is looking at the dynabeads in a test tube.

Philip Horn Børge-Ask looks at the test tubes that contain the famous “Ugelstad-kulene”. Photo: Elisabeth Kirkeng Andersen

While Einar, Tor, Olav and Philip are on a work placement with Marie, four other Ullern students are on another work placement with Thermo Fisher Scientific in Lillestrøm. This is where they develop and produce Dynabeads for the global market.

“Dynabeads are also kalled ‘Ugelstad-kulene’, because they are a Norwegian invention. During the ‘1970s, one of NASA’s goals was to make perfectly round and identical, tiny, plastic microbeads in outer space. No one thought it was possible to make them on Earth. John Ugelstad, a Norwegian chemical engineer, did not accept that fact. He completed several difficult calculations, which enabled him to produce these tiny beads on Earth,” Marie explains.

Thanks to the tiny beads, Thermo Fisher Scientific has experienced huge global success. Even though there are only 200 employees situated in Norway (out of 70 000 employees globally), the research and development conducted in Norway is extremely important for the whole company.

“We are proud to announce that every year Dynabeads are used in almost 5 billion diagnostic tests in the world,” Marie says.

Thermo Fisher Scientific has developed the beads further, so they can be used in CAR T-cell therapy to treat cancer. The first approved CAR T-cell therapy in the world that treats child leukaemia was approved in Norway in December 2018. The advanced technology is based on the Norwegian invention “Ugelstad-kulene”.

  • Watch the video from the Norwegian TV channel TV2 about Emily Whitehead, the first child in the world that received this CAR T-cell therapy. She visited Thermo Fisher Scientific in Oslo in March 2019.

Catching killers

Elisabeth and Mary are supervising the students in the lab

Elisabeth Breivold and Marie Bosness from Thermo Fisher Scientific supervised the students in the lab. Photo: Elisabeth Kirkeng Andersen

“The beads are used for many different purposes and you will learn about a few of them today. Simply put, the beads are like a fishing rod. Depending on which bait you fix to it, the rod can be used in different ways,” Marie says. “Before lunch, we will use Dynabeads for DNA profiling. This technology is commonly used by police to identify suspects after a crime, just like in the TV series CSI.”

During the presentation, Marie shows the students the front page of an American newspaper with a mugshot of Gary Ridgway, an American serial killer, also known as “The Green River Killer”. Ridgway has now confessed to killing 71 women. For many years, the police hunted the murderer without any luck. Finally, new technology enabled the police to retrieve damning evidence from the tiny amounts of DNA that Ridgway had left on his victims. The DNA evidence led to a successful conviction of the killer.

“The DNA evidence was established with DNA profiling, using Thermo Fisher Scientific’s products. They did not use Dynabeads back then, but today, they would have used the beads. You will learn how to do it yourselves in the lab,” Marie says.

Learning to profile DNA

Olav takes the mouth swab

Olav performs a mouth swab on himself, the first step to retrieve the DNA. Photo: Elisabeth Kirkeng Andersen

Before the students enter the laboratory, they need to put on protective glasses, lab coats and plastic shoe covers. The students will profile their own DNA, the same way the police profile the DNA from suspects or criminals.

First, the Ullern students collect the cells with a mouth swab. Then, they add the different enzymes and chemicals that will open the cell membranes into the test tube, so that the DNA is released.

Afterwards, the Ullern students add “Ugelstad-kulene”, which bind to the DNA like magnets. Then, they retrieve their DNA from the solution.

They put the DNA in a kind of “photocopier”, in order to study it with something called “gel electrophoresis”. This is a method for analysing individual parts of DNA that make up the human genome. It shows a bar code pattern, which is completely unique for every person in the world.

Tor is using the pipette in the lab.

Tor adds new chemicals to the solution with his DNA. Photo: Elisabeth Kirkeng Andersen

“DNA is incredibly stable, which means that we can retrieve it from people and animals that died a long time ago and copy their DNA so that it can be analysed,” Marie explains.

“The most fun was to retrieve our own DNA. We tried it ourselves and it was fun to learn how to do it,” Philip says.

The Ullern students were very happy with their work placement at Thermo Fisher Scientific.

“I think the placement was educational and interesting. It was very well arranged and we got to try many different things. What surprised me the most was probably the close collaboration between scientists at Thermo Fisher Scientific – it seemed like everyone knew each other!” Philips says at the end of the day.

After the students had completed the DNA profiling, they ate lunch and then they learned more about the use of “Ugelstad-kulene” in diagnostics, and CAR T-cell therapy.

Elisabeth Breivold supervised the students while they performed the DNA profiling in the laboratory at Thermo Fisher Scientific. Photo: Elisabeth Kirkeng Andersen

 

Sign up to OCC newsletter

Martin Bonde, CEO of Vaccibody, a member of Oslo Cancer Cluster, held a company presentation at the International Cancer Cluster Showcase 2019.

Dynamic networking and pitch sessions at ICCS 2019

Oslo Cancer Cluster and its international partners organised the International Cancer Cluster Showcase (ICCS) on 3 June in Philadelphia, kickstarting this year’s BIO International Convention.

The aim of this annual event is to showcase cutting edge oncology research and development activities performed in start-ups and biotechs from Oslo Cancer Cluster and its international partners from North America and Europe.

This year’s meeting offered a compact program including company presentations, engaging poster sessions and lively networking among representatives of the international oncology community.

Jutta Heix, Head of International Affairs at Oslo Cancer Cluster, and main organizer of the event:

“Building on the first meeting at the Whitehead Institute in Cambridge in 2012, ICCS was established as a successful format to expose and connect emerging oncology companies to executives of the global oncology community attending the BIO International Convention.

“Via collaboration with partners from North American and European innovation hubs, we gather a strong group of exciting new companies and attract more than 200 participants.”

Jan Alfheim, CEO of Oncoinvent, another member of Oslo Cancer Cluster also held a presentation.

Among this year’s presenters were our members OncoInvent and Vaccibody. The dynamic pitch session featured 20 companies from 9 countries advancing a variety of innovative oncology technologies and assets in preclinical and clinical development.

“ICCS was a great opportunity to present Vaccibody and our recent progress towards a relevant international audience. It triggered new contacts and stimulated good discussions following the presentation.”
Martin Bonde, CEO of Vaccibody

Commenting on the highlights, Heix said:

“The National Institutes of Health / National Cancer Institute (NCI) participated for the 2nd time. Michael Salgaller, Supervisory Specialist Technology Transfer Center presented the partnering opportunities and benefits the NCI offers to outside parties from academia and industry.

“Our sponsors Precision for Medicine, Takeda Oncology and Boehringer Ingelheim enriched the program by short presentations and active discussions during the humming poster and networking sessions.”

 

The event was sponsored by:

 

The event was organised by:

Emmy and Benedicte learned about research into neuroscience and how to use modern medical technology, such as CRISPR, when on work placement with researcher Marianne Fyhn and her colleagues at the University of Oslo. Photo: Monica Jenstad

Learning about the human brain

Oslo Cancer Cluster and Ullern Upper Secondary School arranged a work placement for students to learn about neuroscience at the University of Oslo.

Four biology students from Ullern Upper Secondary School spent two great days on work placement with some of the world’s best neuroscientists at the University of Oslo. In Marianne Fyhn’s research group, the students tried training rats and learned how research on rats can provide valuable knowledge about the human brain.

The Ullern students, Benedicte Berggrav, Lina Babusiaux, Maren Gjerstad Høgden and Emmy Hansteen, first had to dress in green laboratory clothes, hairnets and gloves. They also had to leave their phones and notepads behind, before enterring the animal laboratory where Marianne Fyhn and her colleagues work. Finally, they had to walk through an air lock that blew the last remnants of dust and pollution off them.

On the other side was the most sacred place for researchers: the newly refurbished animal laboratory. It is in the basement of Kristine Bonnevies Hus on the University of Oslo campus. We used to call it “Bio-bygget” (“the bio-building”) when I studied here during the ‘1990s.

 

Researcher Kristian Lensjø showed the four excited biology students into the most sacred place: the animal lab.

It is the second day of the students’ work placement with Marianne. The four biology students, who normally attend the second year of Ullern Upper Secondary School, have started to get used to their new, temporary jobs. They are standing in one of the laboratories and looking at master student Dejana Mitrovic as she is operating thin electrodes onto the brain of a sedated rat. PhD student Malin Benum Røe is standing behind Dejana, watching intently, giving guidance and a helping hand if needed.

“We do this so we can study the brain cells. We will also find out if we can guide the brain cells with weak electrical impulses. This is basic scientific research. In the long term, the knowledge can help to improve how a person with an amputated arm can control an artificial prosthetic arm,” Marianne explained.

“The knowledge can help to improve how a person with an amputated arm can control an artificial prosthetic arm.”

Dejana needs to be extremely precise when she connects the electrodes onto the rat’s brain. This is precision work and every micrometre makes a difference.

 

Training rats

The previous day, Maren, Benedicte, Lina and Emmy helped to train the rat on the operating table on a running course. Today, the Ullern students will train the other rats that haven’t had electrodes surgically connected to their brains yet.

“We will train the rats to walk in figures of eight, first in one direction and then the other”, the students explained to me.

We remain standing in the rat training room for a while, talk with Dejana and train some of the rats. Dejana tells me that the rats don’t have any names. After all, they are not pets, but they are cared for and looked after in all ways imaginable.

“It is very important that they are happy and don’t get stressed. Otherwise, they won’t perform the tasks we train them to do,” says Dejana. She and the other researchers know the animals well and know to look for any signs that may indicate that the rats aren’t feeling well.

“It is very important that they are happy and don’t get stressed.”

I ask the students how they feel about using rats for science.

“I think it is completely all right. The rats are doing well and can give us important information about the human brain. It is not okay when rats are used to test make-up and cosmetics, but it is a whole different matter when it concerns important medical research,” says Emmy and the other biology students from Ullern nod in agreement.

 

Understanding the brain

Marianne is the head of the CINPLA centre at the University of Oslo, where Maren, Benedicte, Lina and Emmy are on work placement for two days. Four other Ullern students, Henrik Andreas Elde, Nils William Ormestad Lie, Hans Christian Thagaard and Thale Gartland, are at the same time on a work placement with Mariannes research colleague, Professor of Physics Anders Malthe-Sørenssen. They are learning about methods in physics, mathematics and programming that help researchers to better understand the brain.

“CINPLA is an acronym for Centre for Integrative Neuroplasticity. We try to bring together experimental biology with calculative physics and mathematics to better understand information processing in the brain and the brain’s ability to change itself,” says Marianne.

Physics, mathematics and programming are therefore important parts of the researcher’s work when analysing what is happening in the rat’s brain.

If you think that research on rats’ brain cells sounds familiar, then you are probably right. Edvard and May-Britt Moser in Trondheim received the first Norwegian Nobel Prize in Medicine in 2014. The award was given to them for their discovery of a certain type of brain cells, so called grid cells. The grid cells alert the body to its location and how to find its way from point A to point B.

Marianne did her PhD with Edvard and May-Britt, playing an essential role in the work that led to the discovery of the grid cells. Marianne was therefore very involved in Norway securing its first Nobel Prize in Medicine.

 

The dark room

Another room in the animal section is completely dark. In the middle of the room, there is an enormous box with various equipment. In the centre of the box, there is a little mouse with an implant on its head.

In this test room, there is an advanced microscope. It uses a laser beam to read the brain activity of the mouse as it alternates between running and standing still on a treadmill.

The researcher Kristian Lensjø is back from a longer study break at the renowned Harvard University and will use some of the methods he has learned.

“I will train the mouse so that it understands that for example vertical lines on a screen mean reward and that horizontal lines give no reward. Then I will look at which brain cells are responsible for this type of learning,” says Kristian.

The students stand behind Kristian and watch the mouse and the computer screen. When the testing begins, they must close the microscope off with a curtain so that the mouse is alone in the dark box. Kristian assures us that the mouse is okay and that he can see what the mouse is doing through an infra-red camera.

“This room and the equipment is so new, we are still experiencing some issues with the tech,” says Marianne. But Christian fixes the problem and suddenly we see something on the computer screen that we have never seen before. It is a look into the mouse’s brain while it runs on the treadmill. This means that the researchers can watch the nerve cells as the mouse looks at vertical and horizontal lines, and detect where the brain activity occurs.

 

Research role models

The students from Ullern know they are lucky to see how cutting-edge neuroscience is done in real life. Marianne and her colleagues are far from nobodies in the research world. Bente Prestegård from Oslo Cancer Cluster and Monica Jenstad, the biology teacher at Ullern who coordinates the work placements, made sure to tell the students beforehand.

“This is a fantastic and unique opportunity for students to get a look into science on a high international level. They can see that the people behind the research are nice and just like any normal people. When seeing good role models, it is easier to picture a future in research for oneself,” says Monica.

“This is a fantastic and unique opportunity for students to get a look into science on a high international level.”

Monica and Marianne have known each other since they were master students together at the University of Tromsø almost twenty years ago.

“I know Marianne very well, both privately and professionally. She is passionate about her research and about dissemination and recruitment. She also works hard to create a positive environment for her research group. Therefore, it was natural to ask Marianne to receive the students and it wasn’t difficult to get her to agree,” says Monica.

Back in the first operating room, Dejana and Malin are still operating on the rats. They will spend the entire day doing this. It takes time when the equipment needs to be found and sterilised, the rats need to be sedated and then operated on as precisely as possibly. It is past noon and time for lunch for Marianne, Kristian and the Ullern students on work placement.

Before I leave them outside Niels Henrik Abels Hus at the Oslo University Campus, I take a picture to remember the extra-ordinary work placement. And not least: to store a picture of the memory in my own brain.

 

Finally, time for lunch! From the left: Emmy Hansteen, Benedicte Berggrav, researcher Marianne Fyhn, Lina Babusiaux, Maren Gjerstad Høgden and researcher Kristian Lensjø. Photo: Elisabeth Kirkeng Andersen.

 

Sign up to OCC newsletter

Cathrine Wahlström Tellefsen gave a talk to teachers on how programming can be used to teach science subjects in upper secondary schools.

Introducing programming to the curriculum

Programming is not only for computer hackers, it can also help teachers to engage their students in science subjects and inspire start ups to discover new cancer treatments.

 

Almost 60 teachers working in upper secondary schools in Oslo visited Oslo Cancer Cluster Innovation Park and Ullern Upper Secondary School one evening in the end of March. The topic for the event was programming and how to introduce programming to the science subjects in school.

“The government has decided that programming should be implemented in schools, but in that case the teachers first have to know how to program, how to teach programming and, not least, how to make use of programming in a relevant way in their own subjects.”

This was how Cathrine Wahlström Tellefsen opened her lecture. She is the Head of Profag at the University of Oslo, a competence centre for teaching science and technology subjects. For nearly one hour, she talked to the almost 60 teachers who teach Biology, Mathematics, Chemistry, Technology, Science Research Theory and Physics about how to use programming in their teaching.

 

What is KUR? KUR is a collaborative project between Oslo Cancer Cluster, Ullern Upper Secondary School and other schools in Oslo and Akershus. It aims to develop the skills and competence of science teachers. Every six months, KUR arranges a meeting where current topics are discussed.

 

Programming and coding

“Don’t forget that programming is much more than just coding. Computers are changing the rules of the game and we have gained a much larger mathematical toolbox, which gives us the opportunity to analyse large data sets,” Tellefsen explained.

Only a couple of years ago, she wasn’t very interested in programming herself, but after pressures from higher up in her organisation, she gave it a shot. She has since then experienced how programming can be used in her own subject.

“I have been a Physics teacher for many years in an upper secondary school in Akershus, so I know how it is,” she said to calm the audience a little. Her excitement over the opportunities programming provides seemed to rub off on some of the people in the room.

“In biology, for example, programming can be used to teach animal population growth. The students understand more of the logic behind the use of mathematical formulas and how an increase in the carrying capacity of a biological species can change the size of its population dramatically. My experience is that the students start playing around with the numbers really quickly and get a better understanding of the relationships,” said Tellefsen.

When it was time for a little break, many teachers were eager to try out the calculations and programming themselves.

 

Artificial intelligence in cancer treatments

Before the teachers tried programming, Marius Eidsaa from the start up OncoImmunity (a member of Oslo Cancer Cluster) gave a talk. He is a former physicist and uses algorithms, programming and artificial intelligence every day in his work.

“OncoImmunity has developed a method that can find new antigens that other companies can use to develop cancer vaccines,” said Eidsaa.

He quickly explained the principals of immunotherapy, a cancer treatment that activates the patient’s own immune system to recognise and kill cancer cells, which had previously remained hidden from the immune system. The neoantigens play a central role in this process.

“Our product is a computer software program called Immuneprofiler. We use patient data and artificial intelligence in order to get a ranking of the antigens that may be relevant for development of personalised cancer vaccines to the individual patient,” said Eidsaa.

Today, OncoImmunity has almost 20 employees of 10 different nationalities and have become CE-marked as the first company in the world in their field. (You can read more about OncoImmunity in this article that we published on 18 December 2018.)

The introductory talk by Eidsaa about using programming in his start up peaked the audience’s interest and the dedicated teachers eagerly asked many questions.

 

Programming in practice

After a short coffee break, the teachers were ready to try programming themselves. I tried programming in Biology, a session that was led by Monica, a teacher at Ullern Upper Secondary School. She is continuing her education in programming now and it turns out she has become very driven.

“Now you will program protein synthesis,” said Monica. We started brainstorming together about what we needed to find out, which parameters we could use in the formula to get the software Python to find proteins for us.

Since my knowledge in biology is a little rusty, it was a slow process. But when Monica showed us the correct solution, it was surprisingly logical and simple. The key is to stay focused and remember to have a cheat sheet right next to you in case you forget something.

 

Sign up to OCC newsletter

Kronikk: Dine helsedata kan styrke helsenæringen

This opinion piece was first published on 9 May 2019 in Dagens Medisin, by Ketil Widerberg, General Manager at Oslo Cancer Cluster, and Christian Jonasson, Senior Adviser at NTNU. Both are also members of a work group for innovation and business development for the Health Data Program for the the Norwegian Directorate of eHealth. Please scroll to the end of this page for an English summary.

 

Vi får nye forretningsmodeller innen helse som er basert på digitalisering og persontilpasset medisin. Her kan Norge virkelig lede an!

Christian Jonasson, seniorforsker ved NTNU.

Christian Jonasson, seniorforsker ved NTNU.

Ketil Widerberg, daglig leder i Oslo Cancer Cluster.

HELSE BLIR digitalisert og medisin blir tilpasset den enkelte pasienten. Dette er to megatrender som vil endre forretningsmodellen for helseindustrien. Forrige uke kom Stortingsmeldingen om nettopp helsenæringen. Den åpner for store muligheter for Norge.

I bilindustrien erstatter gradvis digital mobilitet den tradisjonelle boksen på fire hjul. Et eksempel er at Tesla blir verdsatt høyere enn tradisjonelle bilprodusenter blant annet for sin evne til kontinuerlig datainnsamling fra bilene. I helsenæringen vil vi se det samme.

 

NYE MODELLER. Med digital persontilpasset medisin vil nye forretningsmodeller vokse frem. Vi ser eksemplene daglig: Roche, et globalt legemiddelselskap, har nylig kjøpt opp helsedataselskapet Flatiron. Oppkjøpet gjorde de for å kunne utvikle nye kreftbehandlinger raskere, for nettopp tid er viktig for kreftpasienter som kjemper mot klokka. Et annet legemiddelselskap, AstraZeneca, har ansatt toppleder fra NASA. Norske DNVGL, som tradisjonelt har jobbet med olje, gass og shipping, har nå helsedata som et satsingsområde.

Helsemyndigheter erkjenner også endringen mot mer datainnsamling. Legemidler blir mer målrettede og brukes på stadig mindre undergrupper av pasienter. Dette utfordrer hva som er nødvendig kunnskapsgrunnlag for å gi pasienter tilgang til ny behandling. Mens det i dag er kunnskap om gjennomsnitt for store pasientgrupper som ligger til grunn for beslutninger om nye behandlingsmetoder, er det med persontilpasset behandling nettopp viktig å ta mer hensyn til individer og små undergrupper. De amerikanske helsemyndighetene (FDA) har derfor lagt frem retningslinjer for hvordan helsedata kan brukes som beslutningsgrunnlag for nye legemidler.

 

NORSKE FORTRINN. Legemiddelverket i Norge gir uttrykk for at de også ønsker å være i front i denne utviklingen – for også de ser at helsedata gir bedre beslutningsgrunnlag.

Hvordan kan så Norge lede an? Norge har konkurransefortrinn knyttet til et sterkt offentlig helsevesen, landsdekkende person- og helseregister og biobanker som kan knyttes sammen gjennom våre unike fødselsnummer. Dette er få land forunt! Derfor kan vi utnytte dette konkurransefortrinnet for å ta en posisjon i den store omveltningen av helsesektoren og helsenæringen.

Nedenfor følger noen forslag som vi mener vil styrke Norges stilling.

 

PLATTFORM. Vi kan starte med å lage en norsk dataplattform. Selskap leter globalt etter helsedata av god kvalitet. La oss utvikle en dataplattform hvor helsedata er raskt og sikkert tilgjengelig for norske og utenlandske aktører. Et eksempel er helseanalyseplattformen. Her må data gjøres tilgjengelig for alle aktører og for alle legitime formål. Samarbeidsmodeller må utvikles som sikrer at verdiskapingen blir i Norge og pasientene får bedre behandling.

Vi kan utvikle bedre økosystemer. Verdiskapingspotensialet for helsedata ligger i skjæringspunktet mellom offentlig og privat. Dagens offentlige forvaltere av helsedata må derfor samarbeide tettere med norske oppstartsbedrifter og internasjonale aktører.

 

INNSYN. Vi kan bruke personvern som konkurransefortrinn. Hver og en av oss eier våre egne helsedata. Derfor er det viktig med digitale plattformer som gir oss innsyn i egne helsedata.

Hvordan vi kommer til å bruke helsedata om få år, er vanskelig å forutse, akkurat som det var vanskelig å forutse hva konsesjonsutlysningen for oljeutvinning i 1965 ville føre til. Historien viser imidlertid at slike avgjørelser kan ha stor betydning for fremtidens verdiskapning i Norge, og for pasienter i hele verden. La oss derfor ikke overlate til tilfeldighetene hva vi i Norge gjør med våre helsedata.

 

 

English summary:

Digitalisation and precision medicine are influencing emerging business models in the health industry. It is time for Norway to lead the way!

As precision medicine develops, data gathering becomes ever more important. Instead of relying on results from a big patient group, cancer researchers are using big data to find out how treatments can be customised for small patient groups and individual patients.

Norway has a competitive advantage on health data: thanks to its strong public health sector, national health registers and biobanks that can be connected to unique personal ID numbers.

We suggest creating a common platform for Norwegian data, where high quality data can be accessed securely by legitimate national and international companies. Through collaborative models, we can ensure that the medical breakthroughs stay in Norway and benefit the patients. We need to develop better ecosystems that inspire simple collaboration between international key players, Norwegian start ups and the public agencies that handle health data.

Data privacy can be used as an asset. If we ensure everyone has complete access and insight into their own personal health data, people can be empowered to share it for the common good.

The decisions we make today will have great ramifications for the future value creation in Norway and for cancer patients across the world. We should not leave it up to chance.

 

Sign up to OCC newsletter

From left to right: Jacques Li, Sam Chong, Diana Murguia Barrios and Jason Yip studied how patient recruitment to clinical trials can be improved in Norway with both financial and non-financial incentives.

Should Norway implement a clinical trial league table?

The students in the picture are Jacques Li, a doctor and entrepreneur from France; Diana Murguia Barrios, an economist and political scientist from Spain; Jason Yip, a chemistry engineer from England; and Sam Chong, a lawyer and economist from Malaysia and Australia.

We asked four MBA students from Cambridge University to evaluate how patient recruitment practices in Norway can be improved.

The number of clinical trials in Norway has been declining over the last few years. There are many reasons behind this trend, but until now there have been few concrete solutions. With the number of cancer patients on the rise, there is a growing need for access to better treatments.

Oslo Cancer Cluster asked four students from Judge Business School at Cambridge University to research how the number of clinical trials in Norway can be improved. The students were Jacques Li, a doctor and entrepreneur from France; Diana Murguia Barrios, an economist and political scientist from Spain; Jason Yip, a chemistry engineer from England; and Sam Chong, a lawyer and economist from Malaysia and Australia.

“The number of clinical trials in Norway is less than half of the number in Denmark.”

The group focused on one of three factors that influence the number of clinical trials in Norway, namely: the patient recruitment practices. After a comparative analysis with other European countries, they came up with two main recommendations on how Norway can improve patient recruitment.

 

Image och doctors and nurses walking in corridor

How do we motivate hospitals and doctors to recruit more patients to clinical trials?

 

One: Motivating hospitals

The group compared patient recruitment in Norway to France, United Kingdom and USA. Norway was the only country where hospitals don’t have any non-financial incentives to recruit patients to clinical trials. If a hospital’s reputation could be improved in a concrete way by having clinical trials, patient recruitment could also be improved.

The group proposed to create a league table for all hospitals, with cancer trial participation as one of the metrics. This would create competition between hospitals, encourage collaboration between smaller hospitals and larger ones, and make information about clinical trials accessible to patients.

If hospitals were ranked against each other based on clinical trial output, they would more actively recruit into trials due to the reputational incentive.” 

The group also uncovered a misalignment between the funding source and the implementers of the clinical trials. Funding is passed from the Norwegian Health Ministry to the regional health authorities, instead of directly to the hospitals who conduct the trials. The group recommended that the hospitals need direct financial incentives to conduct the trials.

“Regional health authorities in Norway need to ensure that funding provided to them for research is passed down to the hospitals conducting clinical trials.” 

 

How do we raise awareness among patients and doctors about clinical trial participation?

 

Two: Raising awareness

A second discovery in the report was the lack of awareness about clinical trials among both patients and doctors. Patients in Norway lack access to relevant information that would empower them to opt into clinical trials. There was similarly a lack of exposure to clinical trials among early career doctors and a lack of initiatives to collaborate on clinical trials among advanced career doctors.

“Raising awareness among stakeholders is key to improve clinical trial recruitment.” 

The students suggested working in partnership with patient organisations to raise awareness among patients. They recommended a national awareness campaign to inform where patients can find up-to-date information about clinical trials. All hospitals could keep lists of their ongoing clinical trials available on their websites.

If patients knew the benefits of clinical research, they would select a hospital that is ranked highly.” 

The group also provided recommendations to raise awareness among doctors to work on clinical trials. Rotational programs and supplementary courses on research methods and clinical trials may spark interest among medical students to pursue work in clinical trials. Seminars and workshops can help to both raise awareness and inspire collaborative efforts among doctors in their advanced careers.

 

Oslo Cancer Cluster wishes to extend a big thank you to everyone who agreed to be interviewed for this research project:

  • Ali Areffard, Medical team, Bristol Myers Squibb
  • Øyvind Arnesen, Chairman of the Board, Oslo Cancer Cluster
  • Siri Kolle, Vice President Clinical, Inven2
  • Jónas Einarsson, former Chairman of the Board of Oslo Cancer Cluster and one of the founders of Oslo Cancer Cluster Innovation Park
  • Maiken Engelstad, Deputy Director, Ministry of Health and Care Services
  • Katrine Bryne, Senior Advisor, Legemiddelindustrien (LMI)
  • Kristin Bjordal, Business Manager for Research Support and Research Manager in Oslo Hospital Service (OSS) and Chairman of the Board of NorCrin
  • Ida Kommandtvoll, Advisor, Department of Strategy and Analysis, The Norwegian Cancer Society
  • Knut Martin Torgersen and medical team, Merck
  • Steinar Aamdal, the founder of The Clinical Trial Department, Oslo University Hospital

 

View and download the following PDF of the Cambridge report to learn more.
Note: This is a short version of the report, the fuller version also includes an Appendix containing detailed information about all the underlying data and interview material. Please get in touch with Communications Adviser Sofia Lindén if you are interested in reading the full Appendix.

 

Sign up to OCC newsletter

Jeg vil gjerne legge lista høyt og foreslå en felles database for data fra kliniske studier, hvor både firmaer og myndigheter har tilgang til helsedata umiddelbart etter at hver pasient har fått sin behandling, skriver Ketil Widerberg.

Hvordan gjør vi våre mest intime data til gull?

The following opinion piece was written by Ketil Widerberg, General Manager at Oslo Cancer Cluster, and published in Aftenposten on 1 May 2019. It is a response to an opinion piece written by Nikolai Astrup, the Norwegian Minister of Digitalization, which was published on 22 April 2019. The texts are only available in Norwegian, but a short summary in English is available at the bottom of this page.

 

Helsedata er en voksende gullåre, men vi kan ikke grave i den uten videre.

 

I Aftenposten 17. april svarer digitaliseringsminister Nikolai Astrup (H) på en appell om våre verdifulle data.

Astrup påpeker at data ikke kan sammenlignes med olje, for det er ikke staten, men hver og en av oss, som eier våre egne personopplysninger.

Det gjelder i høyeste grad de mest intime av våre data: helsedata.

 

En gullåre av data

Helsedata er en voksende gullåre, men vi kan ikke grave i den uten videre.

Hadde vi ikke først bygd opp beskyttelse av norske data og kompetanse, ville ikke prosjekter som DoMore blitt til.

Forskerne i DoMore bruker avansert bildeanalyse for å gi mer presise kreftprognoser. Samtidig ville ikke prosjektet eksistert uten internasjonale data og kompetanse.

For næringen som jeg jobber i, helsenæringen, er spørsmålet hvordan vi skal unngå å falle i digitaliseringsfellen. Der har mediebransjen landet.

Facebook og Google får all verdens data gratis gjennom samtykke og tar dermed livsgrunnlaget fra tradisjonelle aktører.

 

Trenger god strategi for kunstig intelligens

For norsk helsenæring blir de to strategiene som digitaliseringsministeren snart lanserer, digitalisering i offentlig sektor og kunstig intelligens, svært viktige. I en strategi for offentlige data oppfordrer jeg derfor til at fremskritt innen presisjonsmedisin tas med.

Da Kreftregisteret ble etablert på 50-tallet, forsto ingen den fulle nytteverdien av et slikt register. I dag tiltrekkes forskere og bedrifter fra hele verden for å få bruke data derfra.

Det viser hvorfor vi også i dag bør samle inn mer helsedata enn vi kan dra nytte av umiddelbart.

Hvordan finner vi balansen mellom god bruk av helsedata for å skape næring og rå utnyttelse av store firmaer? Her trenger vi en god strategi også for kunstig intelligens, som tar inn over seg denne balansegangen i helsedata.

Kunstig intelligens gjør presisjonsmedisin mulig på et helt annet nivå enn vi er på i dag, med mye høyere presisjon i behandlingen.

 

Ressurs for pasienter

For fremtidens presisjonsbehandling er helsedata ressursen vi må samle på. Vi må samle inn helsedata som gjør behandlingen bedre for neste pasient. Og vi trenger en struktur av dataene der både firmaer og myndigheter har tilgang til dem.

Jeg vil gjerne legge lista høyt og foreslå en felles database for data fra kliniske studier, hvor både firmaer og myndigheter har tilgang til helsedata umiddelbart etter at hver pasient har fått sin behandling.

Dette kan bidra til raskere tilgang til ny behandling og bedre oppfølging av pasienter med sykdommer som kreft.

Data former kreftbehandling og skaper nye tilbud til pasienter. Hvordan sikrer vi verdien av dataene? Skal vi gi dem bort for å bygge forskning og industri, skal vi ta så mye penger som vi kan for dem, eller skal vi prøve å finne på noe midt imellom?

I arbeidet med de nye strategiene bør våre mest intime data bli diskutert – med sikte på å skape verdi og næring av dem.

 

 

Short summary in English:

The question Astrup raised in his opinion piece concerned how data sharing can be improved across the public sector in Norway.

Widerberg responds by highlighting how we can make use of our health data to create added value and a successful health industry, without allowing large multinational corporations exploit the data freely.

Artificial intelligence makes precision medicine possible on a much higher level than today. We need to collect health data in order to improve treatments for future patients.

Widerberg therefore proposes a database where health data from all clinical trials is made available to both private and public bodies. This would contribute to making better treatments available sooner and provide better follow-up to patients suffering from diseases, such as cancer.

 

Sign up to OCC newsletter

Fra venstre: Ketil Widerberg, daglig leder i Oslo Cancer Cluster, ledet en panelsamtale om offentlig-privat samarbeid under lanseringen 25. april. I panelet var Håkon Haugli, administrerende direktør i Abelia og Gunnar Sæter, forskningssjef og professor ved Oslo Universitetssykehus.

Ny rapport: Helsenæringens verdi 2019

Rapporten gir innsikt i en næring som i 2018 omsatte for 142 milliarder kroner.

Helsenæringen er en dobbel mulighet for Norge: næringen kan løse mange av våre helse- og omsorgsutfordringer de neste tiårene og samtidig bli en av våre største næringer, med eksport til et globalt marked.

Den fjerde Menon-rapporten om helsenæringens verdi går nærmere inn på tallene bak disse mulighetene.

 

Viktige funn i rapporten:

  • Omsetningen i helsenæringen var på 142 milliarder kroner i 2018.
  • Helsenæringen er global og bedriftene i industrien vender seg mot internasjonale markeder tidlig.
  • Helserelatert eksport var på over 23 milliarder kroner i 2018.
  • Næringen er avhengig av ny kapital i utviklingsløpet: fire av ti bedrifter hentet inn ny egenkapital i 2018.
  • Helseindustrien er en gründernæring: en av ti bedrifter er i gründerfasen.
  • Det er en svært FoU-intensiv næring, der spesielt kliniske studier er viktig. Likevel falt antall søkte industrifinansierte kliniske studier fra 175 i 2000 til bare 72 i 2018.

 

I rapporten defineres Helsenæringen som private aktører i hele verdikjeden innen helse i Norge.

 

Hjemmemarked og risikokapital

Mye er på plass for norsk helsenæring, men i følge Menon mangler to ting: Det ene er et stort hjemmemarked med kompetente, krevende lokomotivkunder. Det andre er langsiktig risikokapital for raskere utviklings-, kommersialiserings- og vekstprosesser.

– Det som er litt fint med de to utfordringene, er at de henger tett sammen. Lykkes man med det første, er sjansene store for å lykkes med det andre, understreket Erik W. Jakobsen, Managing Partner i Menon Economics, under lanseringen.

 

En internasjonal næring

Under lanseringsarrangementet i Næringslivets Hus i Oslo 25. april, ble enda et utspill lansert:

Innovasjon Norge med samarbeidspartnere, blant annet Oslo Cancer Cluster, lanserte en global strategi for norsk helseindustri. Den heter “Pioneering sustainable health”.

– Helse er en «born global næring», og det må vi nå utnytte. Vi må gjøre norske helseløsninger bedre kjent internasjonalt. Visjonen er å tredoble norsk helseindustri innen 2030, sa Hans Eirik Melandsø, sektoransvarlig helseindustri i Innovasjon Norge.

Næringsminister Torbjørn Røe Isaksen (H) var også med på arrangementet og presenterte hovedpunkter fra Regjeringens stortingsmelding om helsenæringen, som ble lansert 5. april. Stortingsmeldingen kan du lese på nettsidene til Regjeringen.

Hvordan kan norsk helsenæring lykkes i å ta en internasjonal posisjon? Det er et nøkkelspørsmål som går igjen i rapporten fra Menon, Stortingsmeldingen om helsenæring og posisjonen “Pioneering sustainable health”.

– Vi ligger i et helsenæringsnabolag. Sverige er store, Danmark er veldig store. Det er en stor fordel at “the Nordic region” er kjent for og har kompetanse på dette fra før. Det må vi utnytte bedre, sa Torbjørn Røe Isaksen.

Ordskifte mellom stortingsrepresentant Ingvild Kjerkol (Ap) og næringsminister Torbjørn Røe Isaksen (H). De var enige om behovet for bedre samarbeid mellom private og offentlige aktører.

 

Offentlig-privat kulturendring

En bedre kultur og insentiver for samarbeid er et annet viktig poeng når norsk helsenæring diskuteres.

– For mange private aktører møter skepsis, stengte dører og problematisering når de forsøker å samarbeide med det offentlige. Vi må ha tjenester som slipper næringen til, slik at næringen også kan forstå hva som skal til, sa Torbjørn Røe Isaksen.

– Det jeg savner i Stortingsmeldingen, er klyngene og TTO-ene. Når vi ser på Menons vekstrater for industrien, ser vi at det er noe som fungerer bra. Framover bør vi gjøre mer av det som fungerer, og ikke bare finne på nye virkemidler. I en videre strategi bør klyngenes rolle få en større plass og utvikles, sa stortingsrepresentant Ingvild Kjerkol (Ap).

 

Du kan lese hele rapporten her:

Bilde av Menon-rapporter om Helsenæingens verdi 2019

Menon-rapporten Helsenæingens verdi 2019

 

 

Lenker til Menon-rapportene om helsenæringens verdi fra tidligere år:

Rapport fra 2018

Rapport fra 2017

Rapport fra 2016

 

Menon-rapporten utgis av: 

Andre relevante saker: